Team:NYMU-Taipei/ymiq1.html

From 2012.igem.org

(Difference between revisions)
Line 78: Line 78:
       <div id="ymi_left_column">
       <div id="ymi_left_column">
  <div class="text_area" align="justify">
  <div class="text_area" align="justify">
-
<div class="title">Overview</div>
+
<div class="title">Abstract</div>
<div align="left">
<div align="left">
-
   <p>Sulfur Oxides (SOX, SO2) is the main precursors of air pollution  which is a deteriorating problem nowadays. Producing acid rain and acidified  soils, Sulfur Oxides not  only result in breathing problems such as asthma, pneumonia, but destroy farm crops,  buildings and environment, causing millions in lost each year.<br />
+
   <p><span class="subtitle">Resistance of Cyanobacteria to Sulfide compound --&gt; Sulfide-Quinone Reductase</span></p>
 +
</div>
 +
<div align="left">
 +
  <p>Several Cyanobacteria have Sulfide-Quinone Reductase (SQR) and thus the ability to deprive electron from sulfide compound. According to both databases of NCBI and KEGG, the sqr in Synechococcus SP. PCC 7002 shared great similarity with that of Oscillatoria limnetica, which is reported to exhibit anoxygenic photosynthesis by consumed sulfide anion. Since we planned to express sqr from Synechococcus SP. PCC 7002 in Synechococcus SP. PCC 7942 and Escherichia coli, the experiment was designed to testify the property of the sqr. DCMU was added in the medium to inhibit photosystem II, and therefore only sodium sulfide in the medium can provide electron for carbon photoassimilation. By creating different dilution of sodium sulfide, we expected that the more sodium sulfide was present, the better the cell grew. <br />
    
    
    
    
   <div class=out style='text-align:center'>
   <div class=out style='text-align:center'>
-
     <img border="0" src="http://igem.org/wiki/images/e/e4/Ymis1.gif" align="center" alt="" width="407" height="303" />
+
   
-
    </div>
+
     <img src="images/ymiq2.gif" alt="" width="308" height="80"><img border="0" src="images/ymiq1.png" align="center" /><br />
-
  <br />
+
     The special &rdquo;CO2&rdquo; infused  device for cyanobacteria incubation<br />
-
    In order to achieve bioremediation,  we choose cyanobacteria as our target organ. However, there is no rose without thorn. Due to lost sulfur  metabolism functions, We use synthetic biology and gene cloning technique to complete  sulfur metabolism pathway inside cyanobacteria.       <br />
+
</div>
-
    <br />
+
-
    <br />
+
-
      <div class=out style='text-align:center'>
+
-
    <img src="http://igem.org/wiki/images/4/4e/Ymis2.gif" alt="" width="428" height="287" /><a href="http://www.genome.jp/kegg-bin/show_pathway?syf00920"><br />
+
-
     http://www.genome.jp/kegg-bin/show_pathway?syf00920</a> (KEGG)</div>
+
</div>
</div>
-
<div align="left"></div></div>
+
</div>
       </div>
       </div>
      
      

Revision as of 09:32, 18 October 2012

NYMU iGEM

Abstract

Resistance of Cyanobacteria to Sulfide compound --> Sulfide-Quinone Reductase

Several Cyanobacteria have Sulfide-Quinone Reductase (SQR) and thus the ability to deprive electron from sulfide compound. According to both databases of NCBI and KEGG, the sqr in Synechococcus SP. PCC 7002 shared great similarity with that of Oscillatoria limnetica, which is reported to exhibit anoxygenic photosynthesis by consumed sulfide anion. Since we planned to express sqr from Synechococcus SP. PCC 7002 in Synechococcus SP. PCC 7942 and Escherichia coli, the experiment was designed to testify the property of the sqr. DCMU was added in the medium to inhibit photosystem II, and therefore only sodium sulfide in the medium can provide electron for carbon photoassimilation. By creating different dilution of sodium sulfide, we expected that the more sodium sulfide was present, the better the cell grew.


The special ”CO2” infused device for cyanobacteria incubation