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Latest revision as of 03:34, 4 October 2012

Progress Log
Details
Both

Week 8

  • Thursday, July 26, 2012

    Focus: Updates on Inventory, Bioreactor Production

    Watch out for children under 5. Details
    Entry:
    Yesterday, we picked up the Pelican 1650 at the shipping storage room. When we took it out of the box, its large, black, chiseled surfaces and side locks made it look more intimidating face to face. A very observant Manny pointed out the lifetime guarantee on the box, which stated the case is built to withstand everything except for shark bites, bear attacks, and children under 5. We had a few good laughs there before we looked through the rest of our inventory: the polycarbonate tube and DelRen rod that were initially planned to make the bioreactor shell; the graphite rods, luer fittings from Cole-Palmer, and a free sample of septas from Restek for the bioreactor; and the valves and tubes for the micropumps.

    We were also going to start machining yesterday. However, when we arrived at the Emerson machine shop, we found out that it was closed until August 6th for maintenance, which drastically pushes back our schedule for production. Chie and Tina left, while the rest of us went to try the machine shop at Clark Hall. To work there, we need to take a 24 hour training course in order to use those machines, so we decided to pay the shop to machine the bioreactor. That way, Dylan can start running tests in the new bioreactor as soon as possible. We will machine another three bioreactors ourselves once the Emerson shop reopens.

    #chassis #bioreactor

    Friday, July 27, 2012

    Focus: Autoclavability of the Bioreactor Design, Filtration System

    Orders just in, leave no bacteria alive. Details
    Entry:
    Dan decided to scrap the solar panel casing. According to Bruce Land, it would be unnecessary because solar panels are built operate outdoors for around 20 years. Also, we considered autoclave temperatures versus the maximum temperatures for polycarbonate and DelRen. Polycarbonate reaches its temperature limit in the autoclave, while DelRen cannot withstand temperatures as nearly high as 250 F. Depending on how the first bioreactor turns on, we may switch the bioreactor shell materials to teflon and glass.

    Maneesh and Dan also looked at filtration systems. Although we ordered hollow fiber module filter for the influent channel, we need to decide what to do for the effluent. Assuming all shewanella fall off the rods per hour, ~8000 mm3 of bacteria would accumulate in the effluent channel in 6 months.

    Lydia continued working with the microcontroller so that it sends an oscillating signal to the micropump. Bruce suggested that she read the manual first to figure out which pins on the chip are best to relay the signals. Kelvin finished the server and started working on the server to client transaction.

    #solar panel #filtration #electronics #software
  • Thursday, July 26, 2012

    Yesterday, we picked up the Pelican 1650 at the shipping storage room. When we took it out of the box, its large, black, chiseled surfaces and side locks made it look more intimidating face to face. A very observant Manny pointed out the lifetime guarantee on the box, which stated the case is built to withstand everything except for shark bites, bear attacks, and children under 5. We had a few good laughs there before we looked through the rest of our inventory: the polycarbonate tube and DelRen rod that were initially planned to make the bioreactor shell; the graphite rods, luer fittings from Cole-Palmer, and a free sample of septas from Restek for the bioreactor; and the valves and tubes for the micropumps.

    We were also going to start machining yesterday. However, when we arrived at the Emerson machine shop, we found out that it was closed until August 6th for maintenance, which drastically pushes back our schedule for production. Chie and Tina left, while the rest of us went to try the machine shop at Clark Hall. To work there, we need to take a 24 hour training course in order to use those machines, so we decided to pay the shop to machine the bioreactor. That way, Dylan can start running tests in the new bioreactor as soon as possible. We will machine another three bioreactors ourselves once the Emerson shop reopens.

    #chassis #bioreactor

    Friday, July 27, 2012

    Dan decided to scrap the solar panel casing. According to Bruce Land, it would be unnecessary because solar panels are built operate outdoors for around 20 years. Also, we considered autoclave temperatures versus the maximum temperatures for polycarbonate and DelRen. Polycarbonate reaches its temperature limit in the autoclave, while DelRen cannot withstand temperatures as nearly high as 250 F. Depending on how the first bioreactor turns on, we may switch the bioreactor shell materials to teflon and glass.

    Maneesh and Dan also looked at filtration systems. Although we ordered hollow fiber module filter for the influent channel, we need to decide what to do for the effluent. Assuming all shewanella fall off the rods per hour, ~8000 mm3 of bacteria would accumulate in the effluent channel in 6 months.

    Lydia continued working with the microcontroller so that it sends an oscillating signal to the micropump. Bruce suggested that she read the manual first to figure out which pins on the chip are best to relay the signals. Kelvin finished the server and started working on the server to client transaction.

    #solar panel #filtration #electronics #software
  • Thursday, July 26, 2012

    Focus: Updates on Inventory, Bioreactor Production

    Watch out for children under 5.
    Entry:
    Yesterday, we picked up the Pelican 1650 at the shipping storage room. When we took it out of the box, its large, black, chiseled surfaces and side locks made it look more intimidating face to face. A very observant Manny pointed out the lifetime guarantee on the box, which stated the case is built to withstand everything except for shark bites, bear attacks, and children under 5. We had a few good laughs there before we looked through the rest of our inventory: the polycarbonate tube and DelRen rod that were initially planned to make the bioreactor shell; the graphite rods, luer fittings from Cole-Palmer, and a free sample of septas from Restek for the bioreactor; and the valves and tubes for the micropumps.

    We were also going to start machining yesterday. However, when we arrived at the Emerson machine shop, we found out that it was closed until August 6th for maintenance, which drastically pushes back our schedule for production. Chie and Tina left, while the rest of us went to try the machine shop at Clark Hall. To work there, we need to take a 24 hour training course in order to use those machines, so we decided to pay the shop to machine the bioreactor. That way, Dylan can start running tests in the new bioreactor as soon as possible. We will machine another three bioreactors ourselves once the Emerson shop reopens.

    #chassis #bioreactor

    Friday, July 27, 2012

    Focus: Autoclavability of the Bioreactor Design, Filtration System

    Orders just in, leave no bacteria alive.
    Entry:
    Dan decided to scrap the solar panel casing. According to Bruce Land, it would be unnecessary because solar panels are built operate outdoors for around 20 years. Also, we considered autoclave temperatures versus the maximum temperatures for polycarbonate and DelRen. Polycarbonate reaches its temperature limit in the autoclave, while DelRen cannot withstand temperatures as nearly high as 250 F. Depending on how the first bioreactor turns on, we may switch the bioreactor shell materials to teflon and glass.

    Maneesh and Dan also looked at filtration systems. Although we ordered hollow fiber module filter for the influent channel, we need to decide what to do for the effluent. Assuming all shewanella fall off the rods per hour, ~8000 mm3 of bacteria would accumulate in the effluent channel in 6 months.

    Lydia continued working with the microcontroller so that it sends an oscillating signal to the micropump. Bruce suggested that she read the manual first to figure out which pins on the chip are best to relay the signals. Kelvin finished the server and started working on the server to client transaction.

    #solar panel #filtration #electronics #software