Team:Columbia-Cooper-NYC/Main

From 2012.igem.org

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The Columbia-Cooper iGEM team is working with Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans to create a light-controlled printed circuit board manufacturing process. This bacteria’s metabolism relies on its ability to oxidize iron; the iron can then be used to oxidize, and in turn solubilize, copper. By genetically altering the bacteria, we will install a light sensitive mechanism which will enable controlled copper etching, leaving a finished circuit board. Once a blank printed circuit board is placed in a thin layer of solid media, the bacteria will be applied onto the surface of the media and light will be focused on it in a desired pattern. The light sensitive mechanism in A. ferrooxidans will activate and self-destruct in the pathway of the light. In the end, the circuit board will be "etched" by the bacteria everywhere but the illuminated spots, leaving a desired pattern on the circuit board. Click <a style="color:#6bbe00 !important" href="http://2012.igem.org/Team:Columbia-Cooper-NYC/Overview">here</a> for details. </p>
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The Columbia-Cooper iGEM team is working with Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans to create a light-controlled printed circuit board manufacturing process. This bacteria’s metabolism relies on its ability to oxidize iron; the iron can then be used to oxidize, and in turn solubilize, copper. By genetically altering the bacteria, we will install a light sensitive mechanism which will enable controlled copper etching, leaving a finished circuit board. Once a blank printed circuit board is placed in a thin layer of solid media, the bacteria will be applied onto the surface of the media and light of the appropriate wavelength will be focused on it in a desired pattern. The light sensitive mechanism in A. ferrooxidans will activate a self-destructing mechanism preventing copper etching in these locations. In the end, the circuit board will be "etched" by the bacteria everywhere that is not illuminated, leaving a desired pattern on the circuit board under the cells in the path of the light. Click <a style="color:#6bbe00 !important" href="http://2012.igem.org/Team:Columbia-Cooper-NYC/Overview">here</a> for details. </p>
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<p style="line-height:140%; padding-left:10px; padding-top:10px; padding-right:10px;text-align:justify; font-size:77%;"> Our project is to revamp a chemical and mechanical manufacturing process, so in addition to working with DNA, we also worked on macro-scale batches of copper foil, ferrooxidans (the bacteria), and other chemicals. Using our liquid media, we were able to grow healthy ferrooxidans and simultaneously dissolve (etch) copper foil much faster than the basal rate (without ferrooxidans). Since our PCB manufacturing process requires the ferrooxidans to "stay put", we have been developing a solid agar-based media, above which the ferrooxidans grow, and below which the copper is etched, again faster than the basal rate. We use nail polish only to simulate patterned etching while the genetics group works. Click <a style="color:#6bbe00 !important" href="http://2012.igem.org/Team:Columbia-Cooper-NYC/Columbia_notebook_1">here</a> for details</a>.
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<p style="line-height:140%; padding-left:10px; padding-top:10px; padding-right:10px;text-align:justify; font-size:77%;"> Our project is to revamp a chemical and mechanical manufacturing process, so in addition to working with DNA, we also worked on macro-scale batches of copper foil, ferrooxidans (the bacteria), and other chemicals. Using our liquid media, we were able to grow healthy ferrooxidans and simultaneously dissolve (etch) copper foil much faster than the basal rate (i.e. copper in the liquid media without ferrooxidans). Since our PCB manufacturing process requires the ferrooxidans to "stay put", we have been developing a solid agar-based media, on which the ferrooxidans grow, and below which the copper is etched, again faster than the basal rate. We have utilized nail polish as a varnish to control the etching until the genetics group completes our biological controled etching mechanism. Click <a style="color:#6bbe00 !important" href="http://2012.igem.org/Team:Columbia-Cooper-NYC/Columbia_notebook_1">here</a> for details</a>.
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Revision as of 17:26, 2 October 2012